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Volume No. 2 Issue No. 12 - Thursday September 14, 2007
The Commonwealth of Dominica Paradise, Eden, Shangri-la



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Dominica - The Nature Isle
In the midst of all the information we are gathering, we come across so much evil and discouraging news.

People seeking the truth want the truth - no matter what the outcome - and we study very hard to achieve this goal. Sometimes it is advantageous to stop studying, stop worrying, for a little while -- even for a day -- and relax and look at beauty in this world. Our minds can get on overload sometimes!

I had the rare opportunity to do this. For 10 days I was in a Garden of Eden a.key.a. the Commonwealth of Dominica in the Caribbean Sea. It is truly an island of beauty and nature.

The lush growth of flora in this sub-tropic climate is amazing. The mountains, the rivers, the valleys, the seas, the ocean, the view, the fruit, the flowers, were all breathtakingly beautiful. You can get a glimpse of these in the photos, but photos do not do the place justice.

What was more beautiful were the people of Dominica. Dominicans are a proud people with a proud heritage. I was honored to meet some of the wealthiest to the poorest (by US thinking) citizens of Dominica. I met with some of the highest educated to the uneducated Dominican.

After my time there, I know the poorest Dominican is far richer than any U.S. citizen. The uneducated Dominican (by US standards) is far more knowledgeable and wise than the 'so-called' highly educated people in the United States. Intelligence seems to be born in the Dominican -- not artificially forced on them.

From the politician, to the businessperson, to the unemployed -- all had a sincere love for the land and nature and what it means to their lives. This concept is totally missing and void in the US education system.

Perhaps it is not something that can be taught in schools. Maybe its the artificial way of life in the United States that makes the US citizen so ignorant of these simple things.

God-willing, I intend to move to this paradise of the sea. I want to invest in this beautiful people. I want to be one of these beautiful people. I want to learn from them --- what I was denied in the United States --- how to love and care for our planet, our land.

I do not ever want to be accused of trying to change the way of life of a Dominican. Why change perfection?

You can retort back to me all the ills on the island, true, but that is from a U.S. perspective. Yes there is poverty, yes there is unemployment, yes there is waste, yes there are many of these things.... but there was love, respect, honor, and trust there also. These are much harder to find in the U.S.

By U.S. thinking the capitol city Rosseau would be a shanty town. BUT I found it incredibly beautiful and clean. Everywhere I went in this city I felt accepted by all Dominicans. This I do not feel in the United States. These people of Dominica - simply love people.

They are closer to the true religion of love than any organized, industrialized, sanitized, religion in the United States.

Men in Dominica can do more with a mache'te, than I can do with a garage full of tools. I experienced climbing a mountain in Dominica, that had steep cliffs, crossing rivers, - you know serious hiking.

My Dominican escorts simply 'went for a walk.' I was sore, exhausted, out of breath, and stopping for rests. My guides were climbing trees while I rested. Dominicans are healthy!

At the same time all the modern conveniences are available on Dominica. Yes there is cable TV, internet, phones, cars, and that stuff. But while I was there none of these were important any more. I believe that these 'things' are not important to the Dominicans.

They have kept their proper perspective on life. Dominicans would rather be outside talking to their friends and neighbors (and sometimes me) than watch the boob tube.

I witnessed one incident I thought was incredible. A Dominican school child crossed a street without paying attention. The boy was reprimanded, kindly and in love, by several adults. Even our guide made us stop the car so he could caution the child.

Everyone is a guardian of the children! Hmmmm, do you suppose this is what God intended?

While there, I was priviledged to meet several of the politicians and government workers. These people have the same love and concern for the land. I was pleased to meet these folks...it was really an honor...and people in the U.S. that know me, know that is a remarkable statement to come from my pen!

I have total disdain for the U.S. government and the atrocities it forces on people around the world. This has developed a mistrust of government in general in me.

In Dominica, I saw government workers that held a genuine concern, and a frustration that they were not always able to assist the people, like they would want to, due to lack of funds, investment, or resources.

They are still better off though than people in the United States. No..not with money...but with incredible wisdom, knowledge, and love for man and the land.

If the Dominican people allow me the honor to move to their beautiful land.. I'll be there within 30 days! I want to learn from them... live with them... love them... become one of them.

I have for the first time met real Americans...living, learning, and loving as real Americans were intended to be. Dominicans are truly Americans and I weep that U.S. citizens have forsaken their heritage and can no longer truthfully be called Americans.

Thank You...Dominica I really cannot even take credit for this article... The Dominican people wrote this one!

Comments about this article? Email:
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Volume No. 2 Issue No. 7
Old ways dominate
Lois Commodore-Gospel artist
Rivets and windmills
Cabrits from ruins
2007 budget missing link



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